Christian Ethics in Historical Context

When Faulker wrote that “the past is never dead; it’s not even past” he may have meant that we study history—of thought and of practice—because we need to understand ourselves better. We also study history to make ourselves better; we look to the past for ideas that have been lost, or are worth remembering. In a society drawn to novelty, looking back can be a salutary exercise. Yet it can also mislead, when it tempts us to nostalgia or eisegesis. How, then, can we fruitfully pursue ethics in its historical context—and what is the place of such endeavors in contemporary religious ethics?

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Christian Ethics in Historical Context